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How can your behavior change after a TBI?

Your brain is your body’s control center. It controls your ability to function, stay alive, and your personality and behavior. Following an accident, blunt force or penetrating trauma can cause irreversible damage to your brain.

Moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries can cause changes in your behavior.

Your social skills may suffer

After a TBI, you may find it more difficult to focus, think or communicate with others. Often, people become frustrated when they cannot process information quickly or know how to respond to it. People may find you uncooperative if you have trouble keeping up with a conversation.

A TBI can also result in poor impulse control. If you have trouble filtering your thoughts, you may not think about what you say or do before it happens. The new struggles could cause you to go from an extroverted, social person to a more withdrawn, uncomfortable person.

You may become unmotivated

An injury can make it difficult to start tasks, even when you want to start them. Lack of motivation does not occur because of laziness but because you have difficulty engaging in the activity. A lack of motivation can change your ability to perform in your professional life. It can also cause you to miss out on hobbies and activities that you enjoyed before.

After a TBI, it is normal to have difficulties controlling your emotions. You may find that you become upset easier in situations in which you could stay calm. To learn to control your behavioral changes, you may require help to identify the changes.

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